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The hypodopaminergic state ten years after: transcranial magnetic stimulation as a tool to test the dopamine hypothesis of drug addiction.

Authors
  • Sanna, Angela1
  • Fattore, Liana2
  • Badas, Paola3
  • Corona, Giorgio3
  • Diana, Marco4
  • 1 Department of Medical Science and Public Health, Section of Neurology, University of Cagliari.
  • 2 CNR Institute of Neuroscience-Cagliari, National Research Council, Cittadella Universitaria, Monserrato, 09042, CA, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 3 rTMS Italia, via Tonale 15, Cagliari, 09122, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 4 'G.Minardi' Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, via Muroni 23v, 07100, Italy. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current opinion in pharmacology
Publication Date
Dec 10, 2020
Volume
56
Pages
61–67
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.coph.2020.11.001
PMID: 33310457
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

An altered dopamine transmission has been described for different types of addiction for a long time. Preclinical and clinical evidence support the hypodopaminergic hypothesis and underpin the need to increase dopamine transmission to obtain therapeutic benefit. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of prefrontal cortex shows efficacy in treating some forms of addiction. Recent imaging studies confirmed that the therapeutic effect of rTMS is correlated with an enhancement of dopamine transmission. Novel targets for rTMS are under evaluation to increase its effectiveness in treating addiction, and research is ongoing to find the optimal protocol to boost dopaminergic transmission in the addicted brain. TMS can thus be considered a useful tool to test the dopamine hypothesis of drug addiction and instrumental in the search for addiction therapeutics. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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