Affordable Access

Hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana (Musa sapientum L. var. Cavendishii) pulp in the rat fed on a cholesterol-containing diet.

Authors
  • Horigome, T
  • Sakaguchi, E
  • Kishimoto, C
Type
Published Article
Journal
The British journal of nutrition
Publication Date
Jul 01, 1992
Volume
68
Issue
1
Pages
231–244
Identifiers
PMID: 1327100
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The pulp of banana fruit (Musa sapientum L. var. Cavendishii) was examined for its cholesterol-lowering effect with male rats fed on a diet containing lard (50 g/kg) and cholesterol (5 g/kg). Freeze-dried banana pulp showed a marked cholesterol-lowering effect when incorporated into a diet at the level of 300 or 500 g/kg, while the banana pulp dried in a hot-air current (65 degrees) did not. Starch and tannin prepared from banana pulp were not responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect. The results also suggest that banana lipids did not affect the concentration of serum cholesterol. Feeding of dopamine, n-epinephrine and serotonin tended to raise the concentration of serum cholesterol. Thus, all the substances tested which were thought to be susceptible to influence by hot-air drying were unlikely to be responsible for the hypocholesterolaemic effect. However, both soluble and insoluble fibres fractionated from banana pulp had a cholesterol-lowering effect, with the exception of cellulose. It was assumed that a browning reaction undergone during hot-air drying might be related to the disappearance of the hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana pulp dried in a hot-air current. The results obtained support the conclusion that soluble and insoluble components of dietary fibre participate in the hypocholesterolaemic effect of banana pulp.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times