Affordable Access

Hypertension, perceived clinician empathy, and patient self-disclosure.

Authors
  • Dawson, C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Research in nursing & health
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1985
Volume
8
Issue
2
Pages
191–198
Identifiers
PMID: 3849039
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare groups of outpatient hypertensive and diabetic patients to a control group (no known chronic illnesses) on their perceptions of clinician empathy and the importance and difficulty of disclosing information about themselves to health care providers. It was hypothesized that hypertensives would differ from the other groups in perceiving less clinician empathy and in attributing less importance, but greater difficulty, to self-disclosing. The sample was 54 hypertensives, 47 diabetics, and 115 nonchronically ill patients. Each subject completed the Empathy scale of the Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory and a patient self-disclosure questionnaire. The empathy hypothesis was supported but the self-disclosure hypotheses were not. Hypertensive patients differed from other patients in perceiving the least clinician empathy and in attributing the greatest importance to discussing their responses to health care.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times