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Hyaluronan bound mature sperm count (HB-MaSC) is a more informative indicator of fertility than conventional sperm parameters: Correlations with Body Mass Index (BMI).

Authors
  • Szucs, Miklos1
  • Osvath, Peter1
  • Jakab, Attila2
  • Varga, Daniel3
  • Varga, Balazs3
  • Juhasz, Bela4
  • 1 Department of Urology and Andrology, Kenezy Gyula University Hospital, University of Debrecen, H4001, Debrecen, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, H4032, Debrecen, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 3 Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, H4032, Debrecen, Hungary. , (Hungary)
  • 4 Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, H4032, Debrecen, Hungary. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Hungary)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Reproductive biology
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2019
Volume
19
Issue
1
Pages
38–44
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.repbio.2019.02.002
PMID: 30772339
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The relationship between overweight and male fertility is well studied, still the correlation of obesity and decreased sperm quality is a subject to debate. The widely used conventional spermatological examinations alone seem to be inadequate to assess fertilization potential. Hyaluronan Binding Assay (HBA®) is one of the available validated tests that allows the functional examination of sperm. Data of 72 male patients (mean age 33.9 (24-43) years) from infertile couples were analysed. Body Mass Index (BMI) determination, conventional semen analysis and HBA were performed. Additionally, a relatively new Hyaluronan Bound Matured Sperm Count (HB-MaSC) -index, first introduced by the authors in 2015, was calculated. This index reflects fertilization potential of sperm more precisely. With the increase of BMI, sperm count decreased significantly until about 25 kg/m2, above 25 kg/m2 no further decrease was observed, although sperm count remained permanently low. Greater body weight (in the 70-90 kg range) was observed to have a significant negative effect only on the progressive sperm motility. In addition to sperm concentration and motility, sperm fertilization potential is also negatively affected by obesity, but is irrespective of body weight, as evaluated using BMI + HB-MaSC linear regression analyses adjusted for age and weight. This correlation between male BMI and sperm fertilization potential - as opposed to the conventional correlations with sperm concentration or motility - appears to provide more helpful information in the identification of real capability for fertilization. Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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