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Human Mast Cell Development from Hematopoietic Stem Cells in a Connective Tissue-Equivalent Model.

Authors
  • Derakhshan, Tahereh1
  • Bhowmick, Rudra1
  • Meinkoth, James H2
  • Ritchey, Jerry W2
  • Gappa-Fahlenkamp, Heather1
  • 1 School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma.
  • 2 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Tissue Engineering Part A
Publisher
Mary Ann Liebert
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2019
Volume
25
Issue
21-22
Pages
1564–1574
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1089/ten.TEA.2018.0347
PMID: 30896346
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Mast cells (MCs) play critical roles in the pathogenesis of IgE- and non-IgE-mediated immune responses, as well as host defense against parasites, bacteria, and viruses. Due to the effect of extracellular matrix components on tissue morphogenesis and cell behavior, utilizing a tissue model that mimics MC microenvironmental conditions in vivo has greater relevance for in vitro studies. For this work, MCs were developed within a connective tissue-equivalent model and cell function was examined in response to an allergen. MCs are located in proximity to fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs) that play a role in MC development and maturity. Accordingly, MC progenitors isolated from human peripheral blood were co-cultured with human primary fibroblasts in a 3D collagen matrix to represent the connective tissue. The matrix was coated with type IV collagen and fibronectin before seeding with primary human ECs, representing the capillary wall. The stem cell-derived cells demonstrated MC characteristics, including typical MC morphology, and the expression of cytoplasmic granules and phenotypic markers. Also, the generated cells released histamine in IgE-mediated reactions, showing typical MC functional phenotype in an immediate-type allergenic response. The created tissue model is applicable to a variety of research studies and allergy testing. Impact Statement Mast cells (MCs) are key effector and immunoregulatory cells in immune disorders; however, their role is not fully understood. Few studies have investigated human ex vivo MCs in culture, due to the difficulties in isolating large numbers. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, the generation of cells exhibiting MC phenotypic and functional characteristics from hematopoietic stem cells within a connective tissue-equivalent model with ancillary cells. Utilizing the 3D matrix-embedded cells can advance our understanding of MC biological profile and immunoregulatory roles. The tissue model can also be used for studying the mechanism of allergic diseases and other inflammatory disorders.

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