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Human cytotoxic T cell clones directed against herpes simplex virus-infected cells. IV. Recognition and activation by cloned glycoproteins gB and gD.

Authors
  • Jm, Zarling
  • Pa, Moran
  • Rl, Burke
  • C, Pachl
  • Phil Berman
  • La, Lasky
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Immunology
Publisher
The American Association of Immunologists
Volume
136
Issue
12
Pages
4669–4673
Source
UCSC Bioinformatics biomedical-ucsc
License
Unknown

Abstract

Results of studies in mice and clinical observations in man indicate that T cell-mediated immunity is important in resistance to herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections. This study was undertaken to elucidate the viral antigen specificity of human HSV-immune T cells. Purified HSV-1 glycoproteins gB-1 and gD-1, cloned and expressed in mammalian cells, were found to stimulate proliferation of, and interleukin 2 (IL 2) production by, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of HSV seropositive individuals, indicating the presence of memory T cells to gB-1 and gD-1 in individuals with serologic evidence of immunity to HSV. Second, T cell clones, generated by stimulation of PBL with HSV-1, were found to recognize gB-1 or gD-1, as evidenced by the ability of the clones to proliferate in response to stimulation with gB-1 or gD-1 in the absence of exogenous IL 2. Third, HSV-specific T cell clones, lytic for HSV-1 or both HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected autologous target cells, were generated after stimulation of PBL with purified cloned gB-1 or gD-1. Our findings, that human HSV-specific T cells can recognize and be activated by HSV subunit antigens gB-1 or gD-1, imply that these glycoproteins play a role in human T cell-mediated immunity to HSV and support the contention that a gB-1 or gD-1 subunit vaccine may be protective in man.

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