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Human brain activity time-locked to rapid eye movements during REM sleep.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental Brain Research
1432-1106
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Volume
192
Issue
4
Pages
657–667
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00221-008-1579-2
PMID: 18830586
Source
Medline

Abstract

To identify the neural substrate of rapid eye movements (REMs) during REM sleep in humans, we conducted simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and polysomnographic recording during REM sleep. Event-related fMRI analysis time-locked to the occurrence of REMs revealed that the pontine tegmentum, ventroposterior thalamus, primary visual cortex, putamen and limbic areas (the anterior cingulate, parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala) were activated in association with REMs. A control experiment during which subjects made self-paced saccades in total darkness showed no activation in the visual cortex. The REM-related activation of the primary visual cortex without visual input from the retina provides neural evidence for the existence of human ponto-geniculo-occipital waves (PGO waves) and a link between REMs and dreaming. Furthermore, the time-course analysis of blood oxygenation level-dependent responses indicated that the activation of the pontine tegmentum, ventroposterior thalamus and primary visual cortex started before the occurrence of REMs. On the other hand, the activation of the putamen and limbic areas accompanied REMs. The activation of the parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala simultaneously with REMs suggests that REMs and/or their generating mechanism are not merely an epiphenomenon of PGO waves, but may be linked to the triggering activation of these areas.

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