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Human autoantibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) induced by a vaccinia-CEA vaccine.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical cancer research : an official journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Publication Date
Volume
6
Issue
1
Pages
34–41
Identifiers
PMID: 10656429
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a well-characterized oncofetal glycoprotein whose overexpression by human adenocarcinomas has been a target for cancer immunotherapy. Limited information is available regarding the ability of patients to mount an antibody response to this self-antigen following vaccination. Recombinant vaccinia viruses encoding full-length or internally deleted cDNAs for human CEA were used to vaccinate 32 patients with CEA-expressing adenocarcinomas, predominantly of colorectal origin. CEA-specific autoantibodies were induced by vaccination in 7 of 32 patients. None of the patients had CEA antibodies detected before vaccination. CEA specificity of the antibodies initially identified by ELISA was confirmed by competitive inhibition analysis as well as recognition of recombinant CEA produced in baculovirus-infected insect cell cultures and human cell cultures by Western blot. The CEA autoantibodies were predominantly IgG1, with a minority of patients also demonstrating IgM autoantibodies. CEA antibodies were of low titer and low avidity, based on competitive inhibition assays. These autoantibodies did not affect clinical serum CEA protein quantitation. Furthermore, elevated serum CEA levels commonly encountered in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma did not hinder detection of low avidity polyclonal CEA antibodies. CEA antibodies such as those induced in these pilot trials are projected to have modest antitumor activity. Thus, additional Phase I/II trials of recombinant vaccinia-CEA with alternative prime-boost approaches and/or augmentation strategies are warranted in an effort to enhance the frequency and avidity of CEA-specific autoantibodies and cytolytic T cells before Phase III trials.

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