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How Much Carbon Dioxide Goes From the Air Into the Oceans?

Authors
  • Esters, Leonie1
  • Ward, Brian2
  • 1 Air, Water and Landscape Science (LUVAL), Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala , (Sweden)
  • 2 AirSea Laboratory, School of Physics and Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway , (Ireland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers for Young Minds
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
May 13, 2022
Volume
10
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/frym.2022.699983
Source
Frontiers
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Earth and Its Resources
  • New Discovery
License
Green

Abstract

Climate change is occurring today because of a buildup of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. This buildup of CO2 is mostly from burning fossil fuels for our energy needs. The oceans take up and store a lot of CO2 from the atmosphere. To know how much CO2 the oceans take up, we must understand the processes involved. These processes include the mixing of ocean water. Turbulent mixing is a fast and effective way to mix up ocean water, and it happens when for example wind blows over the ocean and creates waves. However, it is difficult to measure turbulent mixing close to the ocean surface. In this article, we describe how we overcame this problem and how we used our measurements to learn about the exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the oceans.

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