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How to make a tongue: Cellular and molecular regulation of muscle and connective tissue formation during mammalian tongue development.

Authors
  • Cobourne, Martyn T1
  • Iseki, Sachiko2
  • Birjandi, Anahid A3
  • Adel Al-Lami, Hadeel4
  • Thauvin-Robinet, Christel5
  • Xavier, Guilherme M6
  • Liu, Karen J3
  • 1 Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology, Kings College London Dental Institute, London, United Kingdom; Department of Orthodontics, Kings College London Dental Institute, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Section of Molecular Craniofacial Embryology, Graduate School of Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology, Kings College London Dental Institute, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology, Kings College London Dental Institute, London, United Kingdom; Department of Orthodontics, University of Baghdad College of Dentistry, Baghdad, Iraq. , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 Centre de Génétique, Centre de Référence Maladies Rares "Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes malformatifs", FHU TRANSLAD, Hôpital d'Enfants, CHU Dijon Bourgogne, Dijon, France; Inserm - Université de Bourgogne UMR 1231 GAD, Génétique des Anomalies du Développement, Dijon, France. , (France)
  • 6 Centre for Craniofacial and Regenerative Biology, Kings College London Dental Institute, London, United Kingdom; Department of Orthodontics, Kings College London Dental Institute, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2019
Volume
91
Pages
45–54
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2018.04.016
PMID: 29784581
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The vertebrate tongue is a complex muscular organ situated in the oral cavity and involved in multiple functions including mastication, taste sensation, articulation and the maintenance of oral health. Although the gross embryological contributions to tongue formation have been known for many years, it is only relatively recently that the molecular pathways regulating these processes have begun to be discovered. In particular, there is now evidence that the Hedgehog, TGF-Beta, Wnt and Notch signaling pathways all play an important role in mediating appropriate signaling interactions between the epithelial, cranial neural crest and mesodermal cell populations that are required to form the tongue. In humans, a number of congenital abnormalities that affect gross morphology of the tongue have also been described, occurring in isolation or as part of a developmental syndrome, which can greatly impact on the health and well-being of affected individuals. These anomalies can range from an absence of tongue formation (aglossia) through to diminutive (microglossia), enlarged (macroglossia) or bifid tongue. Here, we present an overview of the gross anatomy and embryology of mammalian tongue development, focusing on the molecular processes underlying formation of the musculature and connective tissues within this organ. We also survey the clinical presentation of tongue anomalies seen in human populations, whilst considering their developmental and genetic etiology. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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