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How amylose molecular fine structure of rice starch affects functional properties.

Authors
  • Tao, Keyu1
  • Li, Cheng2
  • Yu, Wenwen3
  • Gilbert, Robert G4
  • Li, Enpeng2
  • 1 Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product Safety, College of Agriculture, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009, China; The University of Queensland, Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product Safety, College of Agriculture, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009, China. , (China)
  • 3 The University of Queensland, Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product Safety, College of Agriculture, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009, China; The University of Queensland, Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Carbohydrate polymers
Publication Date
Jan 15, 2019
Volume
204
Pages
24–31
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2018.09.078
PMID: 30366537
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Starch molecular fine structure can have significant effects on pasting and thermal properties of rice flour. This study investigates the mechanistic explanation of these effects, by obtaining data for rice flour with different starch fine structures. Starch structural parameters for both amylose and amylopectin were obtained using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC, a type of gel-permeation chromatography, GPC), and the data fitted with methodologies (one of which is new) based on the underlying biosynthetic processes. It is found that the setback viscosity of rice starch measured by the rapid viscosity analyzer (RVA) depends not only on amylose content but also on the amount of long amylose chains and the size of whole amylopectin molecules. Conversely, long amylose chains and large amylopectin molecules are found to be responsible for the lower peak and trough viscosities. Other results for the effects of amylopectin chains are consistent with the literature. Mechanistic explanations for all observations are put forward. The novel findings about the influence of the distribution of amylose chain lengths and whole amylopectin size, in addition to amylose content alone, can provide guidance for rice breeders and food scientists in the selection of rices with improved functional properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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