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Household triclosan and triclocarban effects on the infant and maternal microbiome.

Authors
  • Ribado, Jessica V1
  • Ley, Catherine2
  • Haggerty, Thomas D2
  • Tkachenko, Ekaterina3
  • Bhatt, Ami S4, 3
  • Parsonnet, Julie5, 6
  • 1 Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
  • 2 Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
  • 3 Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
  • 4 Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA [email protected] [email protected]
  • 5 Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA [email protected] [email protected]
  • 6 Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
EMBO Molecular Medicine
Publisher
EMBO
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
9
Issue
12
Pages
1732–1741
Identifiers
DOI: 10.15252/emmm.201707882
PMID: 29030459
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

In 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration banned the use of specific microbicides in some household and personal wash products due to concerns that these chemicals might induce antibiotic resistance or disrupt human microbial communities. Triclosan and triclocarban (referred to as TCs) are the most common antimicrobials in household and personal care products, but the extent to which TC exposure perturbs microbial communities in humans, particularly during infant development, was unknown. We conducted a randomized intervention of TC-containing household and personal care products during the first year following birth to characterize whether TC exposure from wash products perturbs microbial communities in mothers and their infants. Longitudinal survey of the gut microbiota using 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing showed that TC exposure from wash products did not induce global reconstruction or loss of microbial diversity of either infant or maternal gut microbiotas. Broadly antibiotic-resistant species from the phylum Proteobacteria, however, were enriched in stool samples from mothers in TC households after the introduction of triclosan-containing toothpaste. When compared by urinary triclosan level, agnostic to treatment arm, infants with higher triclosan levels also showed an enrichment of Proteobacteria species. Despite the minimal effects of TC exposure from wash products on the gut microbial community of infants and adults, detected taxonomic differences highlight the need for consumer safety testing of antimicrobial self-care products on the human microbiome and on antibiotic resistance.

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