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Homeless in Post-Modern Linguistics? (Re/Dis)placing Hispanic Dialectology

Authors
  • Lipski, John M.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics
Publisher
De Gruyter Mouton
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2008
Volume
1
Issue
1
Pages
211–222
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1515/shll-2008-1012
Source
De Gruyter
License
Yellow

Abstract

Within the context of contemporary Hispanic linguistics, dialectology is often felt to be an anachronism, a notion grounded in the stereotype of the dialectologist as linguistic butterfly-collector. In fact this view is as unrealistic in the 21st century as the concept of a physician administering leeches and “philtres,” and stems from a failure to acknowledge that dialectology has evolved together with the rest of linguistics. Dialectology as currently practiced is best defined as the response to the question of how and why languages vary regionally and socially. As such, dialectology intersects with, but is not superseded by, sociolinguistics; contemporary dialectology includes theoretical advances in syntax, phonology, phonetics, historical linguistics, and variational linguistics.

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