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HIV co-infection is associated with increased transmission risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus.

Authors
  • Ragonnet-Cronin, Manon1, 2
  • Hostager, Reilly1
  • Hedskog, Charlotte3
  • Osinusi, Ana3
  • Svarovskaia, Eugenia3
  • Wertheim, Joel O1
  • 1 Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.
  • 2 Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, London, UK.
  • 3 Gilead Sciences, Foster City, California, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Viral Hepatitis
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Jun 13, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jvh.13160
PMID: 31194901
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Molecular epidemiological analysis of viral pathogens can identify factors associated with increased transmission risk. We investigated the frequency of genetic clustering in a large dataset of NS34A, NS5A, and NS5B viral sequences from patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1-6 infection. Within a subset of patients with longitudinal samples, Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) analysis was applied which identified a threshold of 0.02 substitutions/site as most appropriate for clustering. From the 7,457 patients with chronic HCV infection included in this analysis, we inferred 256 clusters comprising 541 patients (7.3%). We found that HCV/HIV co-infection, young age, and high HCV viral load were all associated with increased clustering frequency, an indicator of increased transmission risk. In light of previous work on HCV/HIV co-infection in acute HCV cohorts, our results suggest that patients with HCV/HIV co-infection may disproportionately be the source of new HCV infections and treatment efforts should be geared towards elimination in this vulnerable population. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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