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HIV and bone disease

Authors
  • Stone, Benjamin
  • Dockrell, David
  • Bowman, Christine
  • McCloskey, Eugene
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics
Publisher
Elsevier BV
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2010
Volume
503
Issue
1
Pages
66–77
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.abb.2010.07.029
Source
Elsevier
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Advances in management have resulted in a dramatic decline in mortality for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This decrease in mortality, initially the result of improved prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections but later mediated by the use of highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to the need to consider long-term complications of the disease itself, or its treatment. Bone disease is increasingly recognised as a concern. The prevalence of reduced BMD and possibly also fracture incidence are increased in HIV-positive individuals compared with HIV-negative controls. There are many potential explanations for this – an increased prevalence of established osteoporosis risk factors in the HIV-positive population, a likely direct effect of HIV infection itself and a possible contributory role of ARV therapy. At present, the assessment of bone disease and fracture risk remains patchy, with little or no guidance on identifying those at increased risk of reduced BMD or fragility fracture. Preventative and therapeutic strategies with bone specific treatments need to be developed. Limited data suggest bisphosphonates may be beneficial in conjunction with vitamin D and calcium supplementation in the treatment of reduced BMD in HIV-infected patients but larger studies of longer duration are needed. The safety and cost-effectiveness of these and other treatments needs to be evaluated.

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