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An historical analysis of united states experiences using stamp-based revenues for wildlife conservation and habitat protection

Authors
  • Cohen, Joel I.1, 2
  • Altman, Steven3
  • 1 Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA , Durham (United States)
  • 2 2 , Rockville (United States)
  • 3 Science, Research and Education Associates, Urbandale, IA, 50322-1065, USA , Urbandale (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Discover Sustainability
Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Publication Date
May 12, 2021
Volume
2
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s43621-021-00031-0
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

In the United States, the transition from unchecked hunting, habitat loss, and species endangerment to an ongoing environmental awakening has been examined through various lenses. Despite this gradual perspective shift, recent reports continue to warn of global declines in species and habitat diversity. As the need for biodiversity conservation grows, nations lag behind in their conservation obligations, creating a funding gap. This paper addresses an untapped potential for funding available from stamp revenue as generated in the United States. We begin with an historical summary of wildlife philatelics and end with specialized stamps providing for biodiversity revenue generation. After the publication of Silent Spring, stamp diversification increased due to the recognition of additional environmental and conservation needs, leading to stamp-based revenue as one means to mitigate funding gaps. Having introduced this term, we provide evidence of its potential to fund biodiversity and animal conservation. Historically, stamp-based revenues began with Migratory Bird Hunting license stamps, followed by the semi-postal Amur tiger cub stamp, and eventually local and state stamps whose purchase provides funding for local conservation needs. Specific successful philatelic funding mechanisms are discussed from the United State, with an eye to future development and expansion intentionally in support of conservation and biodiversity.

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