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Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome in a Child without Underlying Systemic Disease.

Authors
  • Yeom, Seung Dohn1
  • Ko, Hye Soo1
  • Moon, Jong Hyuk1
  • Kang, Min Ji1
  • Byun, Ji Won1
  • Choi, Gwang Seong1
  • Shin, Jeonghyun1
  • 1 Department of Dermatology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of dermatology
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2017
Volume
29
Issue
5
Pages
626–629
Identifiers
DOI: 10.5021/ad.2017.29.5.626
PMID: 28966522
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Sweet syndrome (acute, febrile, neutrophilic dermatosis) is characterized by the acute onset of an eruption of painful nodules or erythematous or violaceous plaques on the limbs, face and neck. These symptoms are accompanied by fever. The diagnostic features include histopathological findings of dermal neutrophilic infiltration without leukocytoclastic vasculitis or peripheral blood leukocytosis. Sweet syndrome is associated with infection, malignancies, autoimmune disease, pregnancy, and drugs. Patients with Sweet syndrome demonstrate a complete and rapid response to systemic steroid administration. Recently, a distinct variant of Sweet syndrome was reported, termed "histiocytoid Sweet syndrome", in which the infiltration of myeloperoxidase-positive histiocytoid mononuclear cells are observed (in contrast to the infiltration of neutrophils). The other clinical features are similar to those of classic Sweet syndrome. Pediatric Sweet syndrome is uncommon, and the histiocytoid type is even rarer. To date, four cases of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome have been reported in children. Herein, we describe a case of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome in an otherwise healthy 10-year-old boy with no underlying systemic disease in whom non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drug treatment was successful.

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