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Highly Sensitive Virome Characterization of Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens Complex from Central Europe and the Caribbean Reveals Potential for Interspecies Viral Transmission

Authors
  • Thannesberger, Jakob1
  • Rascovan, Nicolas
  • Eisenmann, Anna1
  • Klymiuk, Ingeborg
  • Zittra, Carina2, 3
  • Fuehrer, Hans-Peter2
  • Scantlebury-Manning, Thea4
  • Gittens-St.Hilaire, Marquita
  • Austin, Shane4
  • Landis, Robert Clive
  • Steininger, Christoph1
  • 1 (A.E.)
  • 2 (H.-P.F.)
  • 3 Unit Limnology, Department of Functional and Evolutionary Ecology, University of Vienna, 1010 Vienna, Austria
  • 4 (S.A.)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Pathogens
Publisher
MDPI
Publication Date
Aug 21, 2020
Volume
9
Issue
9
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/pathogens9090686
PMID: 32839419
PMCID: PMC7559857
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Mosquitoes are the most important vectors for arthropod-borne viral diseases. Mixed viral infections of mosquitoes allow genetic recombination or reassortment of diverse viruses, turning mosquitoes into potential virologic mixing bowls. In this study, we field-collected mosquitoes of different species ( Aedes aegypti and Culex pipiens complex ), from different geographic locations and environments (central Europe and the Caribbean) for highly sensitive next-generation sequencing-based virome characterization. We found a rich virus community associated with a great diversity of host species. Among those, we detected a large diversity of novel virus sequences that we could predominately assign to circular Rep-encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses, including the full-length genome of a yet undescribed Gemykrogvirus species. Moreover, we report for the first time the detection of a potentially zoonotic CRESS-DNA virus ( Cyclovirus VN) in mosquito vectors. This study expands the knowledge on virus diversity in medically important mosquito vectors, especially for CRESS-DNA viruses that have previously been shown to easily recombine and jump the species barrier.

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