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Higher infection probability of haemosporidian parasites in Blue-black Grassquits (Volatinia jacarina) inhabiting native vegetation across Brazil.

Authors
  • Fecchio, Alan1
  • Ribeiro, Rayanne M2
  • Ferreira, Francisco C3
  • de Angeli Dutra, Daniela4
  • Tolesano-Pascoli, Graziela5
  • Alquezar, Renata D6
  • Khan, Asmat U7
  • Pichorim, Mauro8
  • Moreira, Patrícia A9
  • Costa-Nascimento, Maria J10
  • Monteiro, Eliana F10
  • Mathias, Bruno S10
  • Guimarães, Lilian O10
  • Simões, Roseli F10
  • Braga, Érika M11
  • Kirchgatter, Karin10
  • Dias, Raphael I12
  • 1 Programa de Pós-graduação em Ecologia e Conservação da Biodiversidade, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Cuiabá, MT, Brazil. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Brazil)
  • 2 Faculdade de Ciências da Educação e Saúde, Centro Universitário de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 3 Center for Conservation Genomics, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Washington, DC, USA; Center for Vector Biology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 4 Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Brazil; Department of Zoology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. , (Brazil)
  • 5 Departamento de Zoologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília 70910-900, DF, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 6 Programa de Pós-graduação em Ecologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília 70919-970, DF, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 7 Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Brazil; Department of Zoology, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University, Sheringal, Dir (Upper) Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. , (Brazil)
  • 8 Departamento de Botânica e Zoologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 9 Departamento de Biodiversidade, Evolução e Meio Ambiente, Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 10 Superintendência de Controle de Endemias/IMT-USP, São Paulo, SP 05403-000, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 11 Departamento de Parasitologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Brazil. , (Brazil)
  • 12 Faculdade de Ciências da Educação e Saúde, Centro Universitário de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil; Programa de Pós-graduação em Zoologia, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology international
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
80
Pages
102204–102204
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.parint.2020.102204
PMID: 33045411
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Human induced changes on landscape can alter the biotic and abiotic factors that influence the transmission of vector-borne parasites. To examine how infection rates of vector-transmitted parasites respond to changes on natural landscapes, we captured 330 Blue-black Grassquits (Volatinia jacarina) in Brazilian biomes and assessed the prevalence and diversity of avian haemosporidian parasites (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) across avian host populations inhabiting environment under different disturbance and climatic conditions. Overall prevalence in Blue-black Grassquits was low (11%) and infection rates exhibited considerable spatial variation, ranging from zero to 39%. Based on genetic divergence of cytochrome b gene, we found two lineages of Haemoproteus (Parahaemoproteus) and 10 of Plasmodium. We showed that Blue-black Grassquit populations inhabiting sites with higher proportion of native vegetation cover were more infected across Brazil. Other landscape metrics (number of water bodies and distance to urban areas) and climatic condition (temperature and precipitation) known to influence vector activity and promote avian malaria transmission did not explain infection probability in Blue-black Grassquit populations. Moreover, breeding season did not explain prevalence across avian host populations. Our findings suggest that avian haemosporidian prevalence and diversity in Blue-black Grassquit populations are determined by recent anthropogenic changes in vegetation cover that may alter microclimate, thus influencing vector activity and parasite transmission. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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