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High prevalence and poor linkage to care of transfusion-transmitted infections among blood donors in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania.

Authors
  • Mohamed, Zameer1
  • Kim, Jin U1
  • Magesa, Alex2
  • Kasubi, Mabula2
  • Feldman, Sarah F3
  • Chevaliez, Stephane4
  • Mwakale, Promise5
  • Taylor-Robinson, Simon D1
  • Thursz, Mark R1
  • Shimakawa, Yusuke3
  • Rwegasha, John6
  • Lemoine, Maud1
  • 1 Department of Hepatology, Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK.
  • 2 Department of Biochemistry and Haematology, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. , (Tanzania)
  • 3 Unité d'Épidémiologie des Maladies Émergentes, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France. , (France)
  • 4 French National Reference Center for Viral Hepatitis B, C and delta, Department of Virology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Université Paris-Est, Créteil, France. , (France)
  • 5 Department of Bioethics, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. , (Tanzania)
  • 6 Department of Gastroenterology, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. , (Tanzania)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Viral Hepatitis
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2019
Volume
26
Issue
6
Pages
750–756
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jvh.13073
PMID: 30712273
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Blood transfusion is one of the most commonly relied upon therapies in sub-Saharan Africa. Existing safeguards recommended include systematic screening for transfusion-transmitted infections and restricted voluntary nonremunerated blood donor selection. We report the transfusion-transmitted infection screening and notification practice at a large urban blood transfusion centre in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. Between October 2016 and March 2017 anonymized records of all donors registered at the blood transfusion unit were accessed to retrospectively note demographic information, donor status, first-time status, transfusion-transmitted infection result and notification. 6402 consecutive donors were screened for transfusion-transmitted infections; the majority were family/replacement blood donors (88.0%) and male (83.8%). Overall transfusion-transmitted infections prevalence was 8.4% (95% CI 7.8-9.1), with hepatitis B being the most prevalent infection (4.1% (95% CI 3.6-4.6)). Transfusion-transmitted infections were more common in family/replacement blood donors (9.0% (95% CI 8.3-9.8)) as compared to voluntary nonremunerated blood donor (4.1% (95% CI 2.8-5.7)). A minority of infected-donors were notified of a positive result (8.5% (95% CI 6.3-11.2)). Although transfusion-transmitted infections are more prevalent among family/replacement blood donors, overall risk of transfusion-transmitted infections across all groups is considerable. In addition, existing efforts to notify donors of a positive transfusion-transmitted infection are poor. Future policies must focus on improving linkage to care for newly diagnosed patients with transfusion-transmitted infections. © 2019 The Authors. Journal of Viral Hepatitis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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