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High levels of factor IX increase the risk of venous thrombosis.

Authors
  • van Hylckama Vlieg, A
  • van der Linden, I K
  • Bertina, R M
  • Rosendaal, F R
Type
Published Article
Journal
Blood
Publication Date
Jun 15, 2000
Volume
95
Issue
12
Pages
3678–3682
Identifiers
PMID: 10845896
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Elevated plasma levels of factor VIII (> 150 IU/dL) are an important risk factor for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Factor VIII is the cofactor of factor IXa in the activation of factor X. The risk of thrombosis in individuals with an elevated factor IX level is unknown. This study investigated the role of elevated factor IX levels in the development of DVT. We compared 426 patients with a first objectively diagnosed episode of DVT with 473 population controls. This study was part of a large population-based case-control study on risk factors for venous thrombosis, the Leiden Thrombophilia Study (LETS). Using the 90th percentile measured in control subjects (P(90) = 129 U/dL) as a cutoff point for factor IX levels, we found a 2- to 3-fold increased risk for individuals who have factor IX levels above 129 U/dL compared with individuals having factor IX levels below this cutoff point. This risk was not affected by adjustment for possible confounders (age, sex, oral contraceptive use, and high levels of factor VIII, XI, and vitamin K-dependent proteins). After exclusion of individuals with known genetic disorders, we still found an odds ratio (OR) of 2.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-3.9). The risk was higher in women (OR: 2.6, CI: 1.6-4.3) than in men (OR: 1.9, CI: 1.0-3.6) and appeared highest in the group of premenopausal women not using oral contraceptives (OR: 12.4, CI: 3.3-47.2). These results show that an elevated level of factor IX is a common risk factor for DVT. (Blood. 2000;95:3678-3682)

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