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High kelp density attracts fishes except for recruiting cryptobenthic species.

Authors
  • Shelamoff, Victor1
  • Layton, Cayne2
  • Tatsumi, Masayuki2
  • Cameron, Matthew J2
  • Wright J, Jeffrey T2
  • Edgar, Graham J2
  • Johnson, Craig R2
  • 1 Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS, 7004, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
  • 2 Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart TAS, 7004, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Marine environmental research
Publication Date
Aug 26, 2020
Volume
161
Pages
105127–105127
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.marenvres.2020.105127
PMID: 32889445
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

As foundation species, kelp support productive and species rich communities; however, the effects of kelp structure on mobile species within these complex natural systems are often difficult to assess. We used artificial reefs with transplanted kelp to quantify the influence of kelp patch size and density on fish assemblages including the arrival of recruiting cryptobenthic species. Large patches with dense kelp supported the highest abundance, species richness, and diversity of fishes, with the addition of dense kelp tripling biomass and doubling richness. The abundance of recruits in artificial collectors declined with patch size and was halved on reefs with sparse kelp compared to reefs with dense kelp or no kelp. These results highlight the importance of dense kelp cover in facilitating biodiversity and indicate that kelp addition could support the recovery of degraded coastal ecosystems. Kelp also apparently drives complex interactions affecting the recruitment/behaviour of some cryptobenthic species. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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