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High internal phase Pickering emulsions stabilized by egg yolk low density lipoprotein for delivery of curcumin.

Authors
  • Li, Zhenshun1
  • Wang, Yi2
  • Luo, Yangchao3
  • 1 College of Life Science, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434025, China; Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, United States. , (China)
  • 2 Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Colloids and surfaces. B, Biointerfaces
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2022
Volume
211
Pages
112334–112334
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2022.112334
PMID: 35051889
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Egg yolk low density lipoprotein (LDL) was used to prepare high internal phase Pickering emulsions (HIPEs) and its role as a stabilizer was comprehensively studied in this work. LDL exists as homogenous nanoparticles with an average size of 49 nm and amphiphilic nature, having a contact angle close to 90°. HIPEs were studied by varying compositions of 75%-90% oil phase and 25%-10% aqueous phase containing 0.5%-2% LDL. Rheological measurement, confocal laser scanning and optical microscopes imaging together with digital photos revealed the solid gel network, the strength of which was dependent upon oil volume fraction and LDL concentration. Optimal formulation of HIPEs was found as 80% oil and 2% LDL concentration, which exhibited small droplets under 10 µm with negligible aggregations, even after four weeks storage under refrigeration or heating at 90 ℃ for 30 min. After three freeze-thawing cycles, the HIPEs were demulsified losing their gel structure, but a simple re-homogenization was able to reconstitute the gel network identical to original microstructure. Encapsulation of curcumin into Pickering HIPEs provided exceptional photostability (around 80% retention rate) against ultraviolet radiation and improved its bioaccessibility from 10% to 50% during in vitro digestion. Our findings may bring new opportunities to design semi-solid foods using natural and edible ingredients. Copyright © 2022 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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