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High genetic diversity of Echinococcus canadensis G10 in northeastern Asia: is it the region of origin?

Authors
  • Wassermann, Marion1, 2
  • Addy, Francis3
  • Kokolova, Ludmila4
  • Okhlopkov, Innokentiy5
  • Leibrock, Sarah1
  • Oberle, Jenny1
  • Oksanen, Antti6
  • Romig, Thomas1, 2
  • 1 Department of Parasitology, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Center for Biodiversity and Integrative Taxonomy, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 Faculty of Biosciences, Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Biology, University for Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana. , (Ghana)
  • 4 Yakut Scientific Research Institute of Agriculture, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Yakutsk, Russia.
  • 5 Institute for Biological Problems of Cryolithozone, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Yakutsk, Russia.
  • 6 Finnish Food Authority, Animal Health Diagnostic Unit (FINPAR), Oulu, Finland. , (Finland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2024
Volume
151
Issue
1
Pages
93–101
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0031182023001191
PMID: 38018122
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Echinococcus canadensis consists of 4 genotypes: G6, G7, G8 and G10. While the first 2 predominantly infect domestic animals, the latter are sylvatic in nature involving mainly wolves and cervids as hosts and can be found in the northern temperate to Arctic latitudes. This circumstance makes the acquisition of sample material difficult, and little information is known about their genetic structure. The majority of specimens analysed to date have been from the European region, comparatively few from northeast Asia and Alaska. In the current study, Echinococcus spp. from wolves and intermediate hosts from the Republic of Sakha in eastern Russia were examined. Echinococcus canadensis G10 was identified in 15 wolves and 4 cervid intermediate hosts. Complete mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) sequences were obtained from 42 worm and cyst specimens from Sakha and, for comparison, from an additional 13 G10 cysts from Finland. For comparative analyses of the genetic diversity of G10 of European and Asian origin, all available cox1 sequences from GenBank were included, increasing the number of sequences to 99. The diversity found in northeast Asia was by far higher than in Europe, suggesting that the geographic origin of E. canadensis (at least of G10) might be northeast Asia.

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