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High-density lipoproteins, inflammation and oxidative stress.

Authors
  • Tabet, Fatiha
  • Rye, Kerry-Anne
Type
Published Article
Journal
Clinical Science
Publisher
Portland Press
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2009
Volume
116
Issue
2
Pages
87–98
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1042/CS20080106
PMID: 19076062
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Plasma levels of HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol are strongly and inversely correlated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Both clinical and epidemiological studies have reported an inverse and independent association between serum HDL-cholesterol levels and CHD (coronary heart disease) risk. The cardioprotective effects of HDLs have been attributed to several mechanisms, including their involvement in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. HDLs also have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties and promote endothelial repair, all of which are likely to contribute to their ability to prevent CHD. The first part of this review summarizes what is known about the origins and metabolism of HDL. We then focus on the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of HDL and discuss why these characteristics are cardioprotective.

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