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Heterochronic meiotic misexpression in an interspecific yeast hybrid.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Molecular Biology and Evolution
1537-1719
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Volume
31
Issue
6
Pages
1333–1342
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/molbev/msu098
PMID: 24608322
Source
Medline
Keywords
  • Hybrid
  • Misexpression
  • Speciation
  • Yeast

Abstract

Regulatory changes rapidly accumulate between species, and interspecific hybrids often misexpress genes. Hybrid misexpression, expression levels outside the range of both parental species, can result from cis- and trans-acting regulatory changes that interact abnormally in hybrids. Thus, misexpressed genes may contribute to hybrid sterility. However, in the context of a whole organism, misexpression may not result directly from cis-trans interactions but rather indirectly from differences between hybrid and parental abundance of cell types. Here we eliminate the confounding effects of cell types by examining gene expression in a sterile interspecific yeast hybrid during meiosis. We investigated gene expression of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. paradoxus, and their hybrid at multiple meiotic stages. Although the hybrid and parents exhibit similar changes in expression levels across meiosis, the hybrid meiotic program occurs earlier than either parent. The timing change produces a heterochronic pattern of misexpression during midmeiosis. Coincident with the timing of misexpression, we find a transition from predominantly trans-acting to cis-acting expression divergence and an increase in the number of opposing cis-trans changes. However, we find no direct relationship between opposing cis-trans changes and misexpression. Contrary to the notion that cis-trans interactions cause misexpression, a heterochronic shift in the normal meiotic gene expression program produces patterns of misexpression in an yeast hybrid. Our results imply that temporal dynamics of single cell types is important to understanding hybrid misexpression and its relationship to cis-trans interactions.

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