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Hepatocellular carcinoma arising in noncirrhotic and highly cirrhotic livers: a comparative study of histopathology and frequency of hepatitis B markers.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer
Publication Date
Volume
49
Issue
3
Pages
450–455
Identifiers
PMID: 6277447
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with cirrhosis and HCC developing in a noncirrhotic liver may have differing pathogeneses. To study this possibility, 425 autopsied cases of HCC were investigated. Of these, 45 livers were not cirrhotic, 50 were highly cirrhotic (liver weight less than 99 g), and the remaining 331 were cirrhotic but not so highly. The average age was significantly older in the highly cirrhotic group, suggesting a longer premalignant period of chronic liver disease. The liver weight in the noncirrhotic group was about 3.5 times that in the highly cirrhotic group. Hepatitis B surface antigen was positive in serum in only 9.3% and in liver tissue in 10% in the noncirrhotic cases, the positivity rate being much lower compared with other groups (P less than 0.005--0.01), yet antibody to HB core was positive in 90%. The antibody titers were low, however, indicating that these noncirrhotic patients had in the past had HB virus (HBV) infection with no residual chronic B hepatitis. Analysis of the grades of anaplasia of cancer tissue demonstrated an inverse correlation between the degree of fibrosis and grade of anaplasia, i.e., the more advanced the fibrosis, the less anaplastic the cancer. These data suggest that HCC arising in highly cirrhotic liver and in noncirrhotic livers have different pathogenetic backgrounds, and that HBV infection, even though transient, has a certain role in hepatocarcinogenesis. The generally held conjecture that HCC in a noncirrhotic liver is caused by nonviral carcinogens and HCC arising on the ground of cirrhosis is due to HBV seems untenable in such a simple concept.

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