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Heel-Rise Height Deficit 1 Year After Achilles Tendon Rupture Relates to Changes in Ankle Biomechanics 6 Years After Injury.

Authors
  • Brorsson, Annelie1
  • Willy, Richard W2
  • Tranberg, Roy1
  • Grävare Silbernagel, Karin1, 3
  • 1 Department of Orthopaedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Department of Physical Therapy, College of Allied Health Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.
  • 3 Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The American journal of sports medicine
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2017
Volume
45
Issue
13
Pages
3060–3068
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0363546517717698
PMID: 28783473
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Height obtained during the single-leg standing heel-rise test performed 1 year after ATR related to the long-term ability to regain normal ankle biomechanics. Minimizing tendon elongation and regaining heel-rise height may be important for the long-term recovery of ankle biomechanics, particularly during more demanding activities such as jumping.

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