Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Heart regeneration.

Authors
  • Breckwoldt, Kaja1
  • Weinberger, Florian2
  • Eschenhagen, Thomas3
  • 1 Department of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Cardiovascular Research Center, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 2 Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98109, USA.
  • 3 Department of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Cardiovascular Research Center, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Hamburg/Kiel/Lübeck, Germany. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
July 2016
Volume
1863
Issue
7 Pt B
Pages
1749–1759
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2015.11.010
PMID: 26597703
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times