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He Tūhononga Whaiaro: A Kaupapa Māori Approach to Mate Wareware (Dementia) and Cognitive Assessment of Older Māori.

Authors
  • Menzies, Oliver1, 2
  • Dudley, Margaret2
  • Garrett, Nick3
  • Elder, Hinemoa2
  • Daniels, Piripi4
  • Wilson, Denise3
  • 1 Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 2 The University of Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 3 Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 4 Waitematā District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of applied gerontology : the official journal of the Southern Gerontological Society
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2022
Volume
41
Issue
4
Pages
1066–1073
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/07334648211037504
PMID: 34365859
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate Māori (Indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand) understandings of dementia (mate wareware) and develop a framework to inform assessment of cognitive impairment. Qualitative, kaupapa Māori (Māori approach) research with 241 older Māori (kaumātua) involving 17 focus groups across Aotearoa New Zealand (NZ) and eight families (whānau) from one region. We thematically analyzed transcribed data from audio-recorded interviews. Two overarching themes, namely, connection (Tūhononga) and self (Whaiaro), and eight subthemes in particular mind (hinengaro), spirit (wairua), body (tinana), family (whānau), social connection (whanaungatanga), identity and role (tuakiri), place (wāhi), and ancestors (tūpuna) emerged. Māori language (Te Reo Māori) was important for cognitive health. The findings embedded in cultural values improve understanding of dementia (mate wareware) in Māori. These themes can inform the assessment of older Māori with cognitive impairment. For those without cognitive impairment, the Tūhononga Whaiaro framework suggests factors potentially crucial for healthy aging in Māori.

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