Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

They have got the blues: patient's mood- and disease activity-related psychological burden of rheumatoid arthritis on caregivers.

Authors
  • Coskun Benlidayi, Ilke1
  • Gokcen, Neslihan2
  • Sariyildiz, Aylin1
  • Sarpel, Tunay1
  • 1 a Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation , Cukurova University , Adana , Turkey. , (Turkey)
  • 2 b Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division of Rheumatology , Cukurova University , Adana , Turkey. , (Turkey)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2019
Volume
23
Issue
2
Pages
84–89
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/13651501.2018.1492728
PMID: 30039721
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as a long-lasting disease, not only affects the musculoskeletal health but also deteriorates the psychological well-being of the patient. What about their caregivers? There exist a limited number of studies on this issue. The objectives of the present study were (i) to evaluate the psychological health among caregivers of RA patients and (ii) to determine the confounding factors playing role on their psychological status. Methods: Fifty-three RA patients and their caregivers were included in this cross-sectional study. Disease activity was assessed by using the disease activity score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) and rheumatoid arthritis disease activity index-5 (RADAI-5), while disability was evaluated by disability of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire. Psychological status was tested by Beck's depression and anxiety inventories (BDI and BAI). Results: A total of 53 patients with RA were included in the study. Caregivers' depression score was weakly correlated with disease activity variables including DAS28-CRP, RADAI and DASH scores (rs = .304, rs = .392 and rs = .301, respectively); and moderately correlated with patients' depression score and caregivers' comorbidity (rs = .407 and rs = .451, respectively). Conclusions: The psychological impact of RA on caregivers appears to be associated with patients' mood, disease activity and upper extremity functionality.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times