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Hard Tissue Augmentation of Aged Bone by Means of a Tin-Free PLLA-PCL Co-Polymer Exhibiting in vivo Anergy and Long-Term Structural Stability

Authors
  • Schimke, Magdalena M.
  • Paul, Swaraj
  • Tillmann, Katharina
  • Lepperdinger, Günter
  • Stigler, Robert G.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gerontology
Publisher
S. Karger AG
Publication Date
Jan 24, 2019
Volume
65
Issue
2
Pages
174–185
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1159/000494798
PMID: 30677770
Source
Karger
Keywords
License
Green
External links

Abstract

Background: Due to aging, tissue regeneration gradually declines. Contemporary strategies to promote tissue-specific regeneration, in particular in elderly patients, often include synthetic material apt for implantation primarily aiming at upholding body functions and regaining appropriate anatomical and functional integrity. Objective: Biomaterials suitable for complex reconstruction surgical procedures have to exert high physicochemical stability and biocompatibility. Method: A polymer made of poly-L-lactic acid and poly-ε-caprolactone was synthesized by means of a novel tin-free catalytic process. The material was tested in a bioreactor-assisted perfusion culture and implanted in a sheep model for lateral augmentation of the mandible. Histological and volumetric evaluation was performed 3 and 6 months post-implantation. Results: After synthesis the material could be further refined by cryogrinding and sintering, thus yielding differently porous scaffolds that exhibited a firm and stable appearance. In perfusion culture, no disintegration was observed for extended periods of up to 7 weeks, while mesenchymal stromal cells readily attached to the material, steadily proliferated, and deposited extracellular calcium. The material was tested in vivo together with autologous bone marrow-derived stromal cells. Up to 6 months post-implantation, the material hardly changed in shape with composition also refraining from foreign body reactions. Conclusion: Given the long-term shape stability in vivo, featuring imperceptible degradation and little scarring as well as exerting good compatibility to cells and surrounding tissues, this novel biomaterial is suitable as a space filler in large anatomical defects.

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