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Hand, but not foot, cues generate increases in salience at the pointed-at location.

Authors
  • Chen, Maggie M Z1
  • Karlinsky, April2
  • Welsh, Timothy N3
  • 1 Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, 55 Harbord Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2W6, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 2 Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, 55 Harbord Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2W6, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Canada)
  • 3 Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, 55 Harbord Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2W6, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta psychologica
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
210
Pages
103165–103165
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103165
PMID: 32853905
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

One line of research has indicated that directional social cues, such as eye gaze and pointed fingers, increase the salience of spatial locations or objects in a relatively involuntary manner (social cueing effect). A separate line of research has indicated that the compatibility between the body part that is observed by an actor primes and facilitates responses with a similar body part more than a dissimilar body part (body-part compatibility effect). The present experiment investigated whether or not social cueing effects were modulated by the relationship between the responding effector and the body part observed as the cue. To this end, non-predictive directional hand or foot cues were presented 100 or 1000 ms prior to a target. On different blocks of trials, participants (n = 19) executed discrete hand-button and foot-pedal responses to the location of a target to examine the influence of cue-effector body-part compatibility on social cueing effects. Response times (RTs) of both hand and foot responses were shorter to cued targets than to uncued targets when hand cues were used. No cueing effects emerged when foot cues were used, regardless of the responding effector. These results suggest changes in salience following social cues are determined by the body part used as the cue and are not modulated by the compatibility between the limb used as the cue and effector. Overall, the social relevance and learned use of a cue seem more pertinent than body-part matching of a stimulus type and response effector in social cueing. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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