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Hair cortisol moderates the association between obstetric complications and child wellbeing.

Authors
  • Fuchs, Anna1
  • Dittrich, Katja2
  • Neukel, Corinne3
  • Winter, Sibylle2
  • Zietlow, Anna-Lena4
  • Kluczniok, Dorothea5
  • Herpertz, Sabine C3
  • Hindi Attar, Catherine5
  • Möhler, Eva6
  • Fydrich, Thomas7
  • Bermpohl, Felix5
  • Kaess, Michael8
  • Resch, Franz6
  • Bödeker, Katja2
  • 1 University Hospital Heidelberg, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
  • 2 Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 3 University Hospital Heidelberg, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of General Psychiatry, Heidelberg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 4 University Hospital Heidelberg, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, Institute of Medical Psychology, Heidelberg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 5 Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Corporate Member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Campus Charité Mitte, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 6 University Hospital Heidelberg, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Heidelberg, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 7 Department of Psychology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 8 University Hospital Heidelberg, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Heidelberg, Germany; University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Publication Date
Aug 18, 2020
Volume
121
Pages
104845–104845
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2020.104845
PMID: 32861165
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Obstetric complications (OC) may have implications for later health outcomes. However, there is a lack of research examining the association between OC and behavior problems or quality of life (HRQoL). We aimed to close this gap and further investigate functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis as a potential physiological vulnerability moderating the association between OC and behavior problems and HRQoL. We investigated 232 mothers and their five to 12-year-old children. Presence of OC during the pre-, peri-, and postnatal phases was determined by interviewing mothers. Children's behavior problems (CBCL, TRF) and HRQoL (Kidscreen rated by mothers and children) were assessed. Children gave 3 cm strands of hair for analysis of hair cortisol (HC). Structural equation modeling analyses with a latent variable of child outcome ("distress"), OC as predictor and HC as a potential moderator were conducted. OC significantly predicted distress (β = .33, p < .01). The model showed a good fit to the data: χ2(14)=15.66, p < .33, CFI=.99, TLI=.99, RMSEA=.02, 90 %CI [.00, .06], SRMR=.04. In addition, HC moderated the association between OC and distress (β=-.32, p < .01). The moderation model also showed a good fit: χ2(14) =7.13, p = .93, CFI=1.00, TLI=1.06, RMSEA=.00, 90 %CI [.00, .02], SRMR=.03. Results indicated that the association between OC and distress was significant only when children had low HC-levels. This was also the case for both externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. Our results underline the notion of OC as a risk factor for child behavior problems and wellbeing and point to an important role of the children's physiological set-up such as HPA-functioning. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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