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Gut-Brain Axis in the Early Postnatal Years of Life: A Developmental Perspective.

Authors
  • Jena, Ankita1, 2, 3
  • Montoya, Carlos A2, 3
  • Mullaney, Jane A2, 3, 4
  • Dilger, Ryan N5
  • Young, Wayne2, 3, 4
  • McNabb, Warren C2, 4
  • Roy, Nicole C2, 4, 6, 7
  • 1 School of Food & Advanced Technology, College of Sciences, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 2 The Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 3 Food Nutrition & Health, Grasslands Research Centre, AgResearch, Palmerston North, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 4 High-Value Nutrition National Science Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 5 Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States. , (United States)
  • 6 Liggins Institute, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 7 Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
14
Pages
44–44
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fnint.2020.00044
PMID: 32848651
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that alterations in the development of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract during the early postnatal period can influence brain development and vice-versa. It is increasingly recognized that communication between the GI tract and brain is mainly driven by neural, endocrine, immune, and metabolic mediators, collectively called the gut-brain axis (GBA). Changes in the GBA mediators occur in response to the developmental changes in the body during this period. This review provides an overview of major developmental events in the GI tract and brain in the early postnatal period and their parallel developmental trajectories under physiological conditions. Current knowledge of GBA mediators in context to brain function and behavioral outcomes and their synthesis and metabolism (site, timing, etc.) is discussed. This review also presents hypotheses on the role of the GBA mediators in response to the parallel development of the GI tract and brain in infants. Copyright © 2020 Jena, Montoya, Mullaney, Dilger, Young, McNabb and Roy.

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