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Growth of pineapple plantlets during acclimatisation can be monitored through automated image analysis of the canopy

Authors
  • Soto, Guillermo1
  • Lorente, Gustavo1
  • Mendoza, Jessica1
  • Báez, Evelio Dany1
  • Lorenzo, Carlos Manuel1
  • Rodríguez, Romelio1
  • Hajari, Elliosha2
  • Vicente, Oscar3
  • Lorenzo, José Carlos1
  • Baez, Evelio Luis1
  • 1 Bioplant Center, University of Ciego de Ávila, Cuba , (Cuba)
  • 2 Plant Improvement; Agricultural Research Council-Tropical and Subtropical Crops; Private Bag, South Africa , (South Africa)
  • 3 Institute for the Conservation and Improvement of Valencian Agrodiversity (COMAV), Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The EuroBiotech Journal
Publisher
Sciendo
Publication Date
Oct 21, 2020
Volume
4
Issue
4
Pages
223–229
Identifiers
DOI: 10.2478/ebtj-2020-0026
Source
De Gruyter
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Pineapple is an economically important tropical fruit crop, but the lack of adequate planting material limits its productivity. A range of micropropagation protocols has been developed over the years to address this shortfall. Still, the final stage of micropropagation, i.e. acclimatisation, remains a challenge as pineapple plantlets grow very slowly. Several studies have been conducted focusing on this phase and attempting to improve plantlet growth and establishment, which requires tools for the non-destructive evaluation of growth during acclimatisation. This report describes the use of semi-automated and automated image analysis to quantify canopy growth of pineapple plantlets, during five months of acclimatisation. The canopy area progressively increased during acclimatisation, particularly after 90 days. Regression analyses were performed to determine the relationships between the automated image analysis and morphological indicators of growth. The mathematical relationships between estimations of the canopy area and the fresh and dry weights of intact plantlets, middle-aged leaves (D leaves) and roots showed determination coefficients (R2) between 0.84 and 0.92. We propose an appropriate tool for the simple, objective and non-destructive evaluation of pineapple plantlets growth, which can be generally applied for plant phenotyping, to reduce costs and develop streamlined pipelines for the assessment of plant growth.

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