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Group-based comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) for adults with Tourette syndrome or chronic tic disorders: A pilot study.

Authors
  • Bekk, Morten1
  • Meland, Karete J2
  • Moen, Erna2
  • Nøstvik, Liv I3
  • Gausdal, Anne-Line3
  • Hummelen, Benjamin4
  • 1 Regional Resource Centre for Autism, ADHD and Tourette Syndrome, Health Region South-East, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 2 Outpatient Unit for OCD-Spectrum Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 3 Norwegian Tourette Association, Larvik, Norway. , (Norway)
  • 4 Department of Research and Innovation, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. , (Norway)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2023
Volume
64
Issue
6
Pages
784–793
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/sjop.12942
PMID: 37339108
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) administered individually is an effective treatment for tics. However, the effectiveness of CBIT administered in groups for adults with Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorders has not been investigated yet. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of group-based CBIT with respect to reduction of tic severity and tic-related impairment, as well as improvement of tic-related quality of life. Data from 26 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analyses. The Yale Global Tic Severity Scale was used to assess total tic severity and tic-related impairment. The Gilles de la Tourette - Quality of Life Scale was used to assess tic-related quality of life. These measures were administered at three points in time: at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 1-year follow-up. The results showed a significant reduction of total tic severity from pretreatment to 1-year follow-up, with larges effect sizes. Tic-related impairment and tic-related quality of life also improved significantly, although the effect sizes were smaller. Motor tics showed a stronger reduction than vocal tics. Additional analysis revealed that all change was achieved during treatment and that this effect was maintained from posttreatment to 1-year follow-up. The results of this study indicate that group-based CBIT is a promising treatment for tics. © 2023 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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