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Group A rotavirus veterinary vaccines.

Authors
  • Saif, L J
  • Fernandez, F M
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of infectious diseases
Publication Date
Sep 01, 1996
Volume
174 Suppl 1
Identifiers
PMID: 8752298
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Group A rotaviruses cause diarrhea in young livestock and poultry; consequently, vaccination strategies have focused on induction of active or passive immunity. Gnotobiotic pigs and calves serve as useful models to evaluate induction of active immunity by candidate animal or human rotavirus vaccines. However, live attenuated rotavirus vaccines lacked efficacy when administered orally to calves and pigs in the field, presumably because colostral antibodies inhibited vaccine virus replication. The widespread occurrence of rotavirus antibodies in colostrum led to strategies for maternal rotavirus vaccination to boost lactogenic immunity and transfer passive antibodies to the neonate via colostrum and milk. The variable success of maternal rotavirus vaccines in the field is influenced by vaccine dose, strain, inactivating agent, adjuvant, route of administration, and environmental rotavirus exposure levels. The use of genetically engineered rotavirus-like particle vaccines in cows to boost antibodies in mammary secretions shows promise. Such subunit vaccines possess potential advantages over existing vaccines.

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