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Gpi19, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of mammalian PIG-P, is a subunit of the initial enzyme for glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor biosynthesis.

Authors
  • Newman, Heather A
  • Romeo, Martin J
  • Lewis, Sarah E
  • Yan, Benjamin C
  • Orlean, Peter
  • Levin, David E
Type
Published Article
Journal
Eukaryotic Cell
Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2005
Volume
4
Issue
11
Pages
1801–1807
Identifiers
PMID: 16278447
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) are attached to the C termini of some glycosylated secretory proteins, serving as membrane anchors for many of those on the cell surface. Biosynthesis of GPIs is initiated by the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from UDP-GlcNAc to phosphatidylinositol. This reaction is carried out at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by an enzyme complex called GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GPI-GlcNAc transferase). The human enzyme has six known subunits, at least four of which, GPI1, PIG-A, PIG-C, and PIG-H, have functional homologs in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The uncharacterized yeast gene YDR437w encodes a protein with some sequence similarity to human PIG-P, a fifth subunit of the GPI-GlcNAc transferase. Here we show that Ydr437w is a small but essential subunit of the yeast GPI-GlcNAc transferase, and we designate its gene GPI19. Similar to other mutants in the yeast enzyme, temperature-sensitive gpi19 mutants display cell wall defects and hyperactive Ras phenotypes. The Gpi19 protein associates with the yeast GPI-GlcNAc transferase in vivo, as judged by coimmuneprecipitation with the Gpi2 subunit. Moreover, conditional gpi19 mutants are defective for GPI-GlcNAc transferase activity in vitro. Finally, we present evidence for the topology of Gpi19 within the ER membrane.

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