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Gout--current diagnosis and treatment.

Authors
  • Tausche, Anne-Kathrin
  • Jansen, Tim L
  • Schröder, Hans-Egbert
  • Bornstein, Stefan R
  • Aringer, Martin
  • Müller-Ladner, Ulf
Type
Published Article
Journal
Deutsches Ärzteblatt international
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2009
Volume
106
Issue
34-35
Pages
549–555
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2009.0549
PMID: 19795010
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is generally not an indication for pharmacological intervention to lower the uric acid level. When gout is clinically manifest, however, acute treatment of gouty arthritis should be followed by determination of the cause of hyperuricemia, and long-term treatment to lower the uric acid level is usually necessary. The goal of treatment is to diminish the body's stores of uric acid crystal deposits (the intrinsic uric acid pool) and thereby to prevent the inflammatory processes that they cause, which lead to structural alterations. In the long term, serum uric acid levels should be kept below 360 micromol/L (6 mg/dL). The available medications for this purpose are allopurinol and various uricosuric agents, e.g., benzbromarone. There is good evidence to support the treatment of gouty attacks by the timely, short-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), colchicine, and glucocorticosteroids.

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