Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Goth Music and Depressive Symptoms among Adolescents: A Longitudinal Study.

Authors
  • Ter Bogt, Tom1
  • Hale, William W 3rd2
  • Canale, Natale3
  • Pastore, Massimiliano3
  • Vieno, Alessio3
  • 1 Department of Interdisciplinary Social Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 14, 3584 CH, Utrecht, The Netherlands. [email protected] , (Netherlands)
  • 2 Department of Pedagogics (Youth & Family), Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS, Utrecht, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialisation, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131, Padova, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Youth and Adolescence
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2021
Volume
50
Issue
9
Pages
1925–1936
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10964-020-01294-y
PMID: 32813164
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Identification with Goth youth culture has been related to elevated levels of depression, self-harm and suicide ideation. However, this identification may be difficult to assess as Goth is stigmatized and adolescents may hesitate to self-identify. Conversely, adolescents readily respond to questions on their music preferences. This study addresses the potential link between liking Goth music and depressive symptoms in a four-year study among 10 to 15-year-olds (N = 940, M age = 12.4 at T1, 49% female). In this study, it was found that Goth music is only liked by a small minority of adolescents (4 to 11%). Both girls and boys who liked Goth music reported increased levels of depressive symptoms as they grew older. The findings of this study suggest that a preference for Goth music emerges as an early, sensitive marker of dormant or developing depressive symptoms in adolescents. The mechanisms through which music preferences can translate into or sustain depressive symptoms are discussed. © 2020. The Author(s).

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times