Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

The gonococcal Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) is involved in microcolony formation and contributes to serum resistance and adherence to epithelial cells.

Authors
  • Semchenko, Evgeny A1
  • Mubaiwa, Tsitsi D1
  • Day, Christopher J1
  • Seib, Kate L1
  • 1 Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Nov 27, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiz628
PMID: 31781772
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea is on the rise worldwide and an increased understanding of the mechanisms of colonisation and pathogenesis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is required to aid development of new treatment and prevention strategies. In this study, we investigate the Neisseria heparin binding antigen (NHBA) of N. gonorrhoeae and confirm its role in binding to several glycans including heparin, and identify interactions of NHBA with both gonococcal and host cells. Furthermore, we report that a gonococcal nhba mutant displays decreased cell aggregation and microcolony formation, as well as reduced survival in human serum and reduced adherence to human cervical and urethral epithelial cells, relative to the wild type strain. These data indicate that the gonococcal NHBA contributes to several aspects of the colonisation and survival of N. gonorrhoeae and may be a target for new antimicrobial or vaccines. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times