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Goal reengagement is related to mental well-being, life satisfaction and acceptance in people with an acquired brain injury.

Authors
  • Van Bost, Gunther1, 2
  • Van Damme, Stefaan1
  • Crombez, Geert1
  • 1 Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 2 CAR Ter Kouter Deinze, Deinze, Belgium. , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2020
Volume
30
Issue
9
Pages
1814–1828
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2019.1608265
PMID: 31030643
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

After an acquired brain injury (ABI), the achievement of previous life goals may no longer be feasible. This study examined whether self-reported disengagement from previous goals and reengagement towards new, more feasible goals, are associated with higher quality of life (QOL) and life satisfaction. We also examined whether acceptance mediated these relationships. Eighty-two individuals (18-68 years of age) with an ABI completed a battery of questionnaires. We investigated the relations between goal disengagement and reengagement on the one hand, and general QOL, disease-specific QOL, life satisfaction and acceptance, on the other hand. Rehabilitation psychologists provided estimates of self-awareness and the extent of motor, communicative and cognitive impairment. Goal reengagement, but not goal disengagement, was positively associated with mental QOL and life satisfaction, after statistically controlling for demographic and impairments. Acceptance mediated the relationship between goal reengagement on the one hand, and mental QOL and life satisfaction, on the other hand. After an ABI, reengagement in feasible goals is more important in explaining mental well-being and life satisfaction than disengagement from unattainable goals. Interventions aimed at identifying and pursuing new, feasible goals may be more helpful than strategies focusing on the loss of blocked goals.

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