Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Germination and Seedling Growth of Water Primroses: A Cross Experiment between Two Invaded Ranges with Contrasting Climates.

Authors
  • Gillard, Morgane1
  • Grewell, Brenda J2
  • Futrell, Caryn J2
  • Deleu, Carole3
  • Thiébaut, Gabrielle1
  • 1 ECOBIO, UMR 6553 CNRS, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France. , (France)
  • 2 USDA-Agricultural Research Service Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research Unit, Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, United States. , (United States)
  • 3 IGEPP, UMR 1349 INRA, Université de Rennes 1, Le Rheu, France. , (France)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Plant Science
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2017
Volume
8
Pages
1677–1677
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2017.01677
PMID: 29018472
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Aquatic ecosystems are vulnerable to biological invasions, and will also be strongly impacted by climate change, including temperature increase. Understanding the colonization dynamics of aquatic invasive plant species is of high importance for preservation of native biodiversity. Many aquatic invasive plants rely on clonal reproduction to spread, but mixed reproductive modes are common. Under future climate changes, these species may favor a sexual reproductive mode. The aim of this study was to test the germination capacity and the seedling growth of two water primrose species, Ludwigia hexapetala and Ludwigia peploides, both invasive in Europe and in the United States. We performed a reciprocal transplant of seeds of L. hexapetala and L. peploides from two invasive ranges into experimental gardens characterized by Oceanic and Mediterranean-type climates. Our results showed that higher temperatures increased or maintained germination percentages and velocity, decreased survivorship of germinants, but increased their production of biomass. The origin of the seeds had low impact on L. hexapetala responses to temperature, but greatly influenced those of L. peploides. The invasiveness of water primroses in ranges with Oceanic climates might increase with temperature. The recruitment from seed banks by these species should be considered by managers to improve the conservation of native aquatic and wetland plant species.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times