Affordable Access

Geographical variation in the presence of genes encoding superantigenic exotoxins and beta-hemolysin among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Europe and USA

Authors
Publication Date
Source
Online Research Database In Technology
External links

Abstract

The object was to examine the geographical variation in the presence of superantigenic exotoxins and beta-hemolysin among epidemiologically independent Staphyirrcoccus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis. A total of 462 S. aureus isolates from nine European countries and USA were examined for the presence of genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, and H, toxic shock toxin-1 (TSST-1), and beta-hemolysin, and 128 of these were examined for exfoliative toxins A and B. The detection was done by PCR. Phenotypic methods were used to confirm the PCR-results. None of the 128 isolates carried the genes for exfoliative toxin A or B. The total proportion of isolates in which superantigenic exotoxins were detected varied from 2% (one isolate) of the Danish isolates to 65% (32 isolates) of the Norwegian isolates. This marked and highly significant geographical variation was also present for the individual exotoxins. The genes encoding enterotoxin C, TSST-1, and enterotoxin D were the most common superantigens. The present and earlier studies demonstrate that the superantigenic exotoxins that were investigated in this study, do not play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine S. aureus mastitis. In contrast to the geographical variation among superantigenic exotoxins, 97% of the isolates were PCR-positive for and/or produced beta-hemolysin on 5% calf blood agar. Except for three isolates, the Norwegian isolates were PCR-negative, but positive on 5% calf blood agar. Sequence variation in the primer regions in the beta-hemolysin encoding gene of the Norwegian isolates is suggested, and should be investigated further. The consistent presence of beta-hemolysin suggests that this factor, or a co-existing gene correlated to beta-hemolysin, may be an active virulence factor in the pathogenesis of bovine S. aureus mastitis. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments