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Genomic organization of the sheep [email protected] locus and comparative analyses of Bovidae and human variable genes.

Authors
  • Vaccarelli, G
  • Miccoli, M C
  • Lanave, C
  • Massari, S
  • Cribiu, E P
  • Ciccarese, S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gene
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Sep 12, 2005
Volume
357
Issue
2
Pages
103–114
Identifiers
PMID: 16125878
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

gammadelta T cells commonly account for 0.5%-5% of human (gammadelta low species) circulating T cells, whereas they are very common in chickens, and they may account for >70% of peripheral cells in ruminants (gammadelta high species). We have previously reported the ovine [email protected] locus structure, the first complete physical map of any ruminant animal TCR locus. Here we determined the [email protected] locus organization in sheep, reported all variable (V) gamma gene segments in their germline configuration and included human and cattle sequences in a three species comparison. The [email protected] locus spans about 140 kb and consists of three clusters named TRG5, TRG3, and TRG1 according to the constant (C) genes. The predicted tertiary structure of cattle and sheep V proteins showed a remarkably high degree of conservation between the experimentally determined human Vgamma9 and the proteins belonging to TRG5 Vgamma subgroup. However systematic comparison of primary and tertiary structure highligthed that in Bovidae the overall conformation of the gammadelta TCR, is more similar to the Fab fragment of an antibody than any TCR heterodimer. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the evolution of cattle and sheep V genes is related to the rearrangement process of V segments with the relevant C, and consequentely to the appartenence of the V genes to a given cluster. The TRG cluster evolution in cattle and sheep pointed out the existence of a TRG5 ancient cluster and the occurrence of duplications of its minimal structural scheme of one V, two joining (J), and one C.

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