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Genome-wide dissection of sex determination genes in the highly invasive whitefly species Bemisia tabaci Q/MED.

Authors
  • Liu, Y1
  • Xie, W1
  • Guo, L1
  • Yang, X1
  • Yang, J1
  • Wang, S1
  • Wu, Q1
  • Zhou, X2
  • Zhang, Y1
  • 1 Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, P.R. China. , (China)
  • 2 Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40546-0091, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Insect Molecular Biology
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2019
Volume
28
Issue
4
Pages
509–519
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/imb.12568
PMID: 30716191
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Sex determination genes are important regulators of reproduction as well as of the development of both behavioural and morphological sex characteristics. The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is an emerging insect pest worldwide. The recent release of the genome sequence of the highly invasive B. tabaciQ/MED allows us to investigate the mechanisms and genes involved in sex determination. The combined genome and transcriptome-wide analyses identified 26 genes putatively associated with sex determination in B. tabaciQ/MED. The temporal profiles of these genes exhibited a consistent expression pattern at all B. tabaci developmental stages: the highest transcript levels were detected in eggs (21 genes, 80.8%) and the lowest in adults (24 genes, 92.3%). The expression pattern was further validated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis. Alternative splicing analysis found that (1) da and mle have sex-specific isoforms in B. tabaci adults, whereas Imp does not, and (2) exon skipping is a common splicing mechanism involved in B. tabaci sex determination. This research provides a comprehensive list of genes involved in B. tabaci sex determination and provides an opportunity to further understand the mechanisms underlying sex determination in a globally invasive insect pest that reproduces both sexually and asexually. © 2019 The Royal Entomological Society.

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