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Genetic study of diversity and blast resistance in Ethiopian rice cultivars adapted to different ecosystems.

Authors
  • Taddesse, Lakew1, 2
  • Fukuta, Yoshimichi3
  • Ishikawa, Ryuji4
  • 1 Fogera National Rice Research and Training Centre, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, 1937, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. , (Ethiopia)
  • 2 United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Iwate University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8550, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Tropical Agriculture Research Front (TARF), Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0002, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 4 Faculty of Agriculture and Life Science, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8561, Japan. , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Breeding science
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
70
Issue
3
Pages
303–312
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1270/jsbbs.18198
PMID: 32714052
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been considered one of the most important crops in Ethiopia. Landraces and improved accessions in Ethiopia were characterized on the basis of polymorphism data for SSR markers, and classified into two groups: I and II. Cluster I was further divided into two sub-clusters, Ia and Ib. Cluster Ia corresponded to Japonica-like type, Cluster Ib to Japonica type, and Cluster II to Indica type with some Indica-like type. Many landraces and improved varieties belonged to Cluster Ia. Superior landraces were included in Cluster Ib. Further categorization based on blast resistance demonstrated three groups: Clusters A, B1, and B2. Cluster A comprised accessions with relatively high resistance, whereas Clusters B1 and B2 included susceptible accessions. Most of the improved varieties were found in Cluster A. Superior landraces, X-Jigna classified into Ib or DNA type tended to be susceptible in Cluster B2 for blast resistance. These results demonstrated that traditional landraces preferred by farmers should be improved for disease resistance using blast-resistant varieties. In order to avoid hybrid sterility occurring in cross-hybridizing breeding between Indica and Japonica types, desirable parental accessions can be chosen within the same DNA cluster. The clustering information among accessions may be useful in breeding schemes for selection of counterparts in cross-breeding programs. Copyright © 2020 by JAPANESE SOCIETY OF BREEDING.

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