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Genetic diversity patterns of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with the mycoheterotroph Arachnitis uniflora Phil. (Corsiaceae).

Authors
  • Renny, Mauricio1
  • Acosta, M Cristina1
  • Cofré, Noelia1
  • Domínguez, Laura S1
  • Bidartondo, Martin I2, 3
  • Sérsic, Alicia N1
  • 1 Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal, IMBIV, UNC-CONICET, Edificio de Investigaciones Biológicas y Tecnológicas, Vélez Sársfield 1611, 5000 Córdoba, Argentina. , (Argentina)
  • 2 Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK.
  • 3 Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew TW9 3DS, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of Botany
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2017
Volume
119
Issue
8
Pages
1279–1294
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/aob/mcx023
PMID: 28398457
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Arachnitis uniflora is a mycoheterotrophic plant that exploits arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of neighbouring plants. We tested A. uniflora 's specificity towards fungi across its large latitudinal range, as well as the role of historical events and current environmental, geographical and altitudinal variables on fungal genetic diversity. Arachnitis uniflora mycorrhizas were sampled at 25 sites. Fungal phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed, genetic diversity was calculated and the main divergent lineages were dated. Phylogeographical analysis was performed with the main fungal clade. Fungal diversity correlations with environmental factors were investigated. Glomeraceae fungi dominated, with a main clade that likely originated in the Upper Cretaceous and diversified in the Miocene. Two other arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal families not previously known to be targeted by A. uniflora were detected rarely and appear to be facultative associations. High genetic diversity, found in Bolivia and both northern and southern Patagonia, was correlated with temperature, rainfall and soil features. Fungal genetic diversity and its distribution can be explained by the ancient evolutionary history of the target fungi and by micro-scale environmental conditions with a geographical mosaic pattern. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: [email protected]

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