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Genetic diversity and evolutionary history of Korean isolates of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus from 2013–2016

Authors
  • Yun, Mi-ran1
  • Ryou, Jungsang2
  • Choi, Wooyoung3
  • Lee, Joo-Yeon2
  • Park, Sun-Whan4
  • Kim, Dae-Won1
  • 1 Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 200 Osongsaengmyeong2-ro, Heungdeok-gu, Cheogju-si, Chungbuk, 28160, Republic of Korea , Cheogju-si (South Korea)
  • 2 Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 187 Osongsaengmyeong2-ro, Heungdeok-gu, Cheogju-si, Chungbuk, 28160, Republic of Korea , Cheogju-si (South Korea)
  • 3 Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 187 Osongsaengmyeong2-ro, Heungdeok-gu, Cheogju-si, Chungbuk, 28160, Republic of Korea , Cheogju-si (South Korea)
  • 4 Jeju National Quarantine Station, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 356 Central Goverment office-Jeju, 59 Cheongsa-ro, Jeju-si, 63219, Republic of Korea , Jeju-si (South Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of Virology
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jul 22, 2020
Volume
165
Issue
11
Pages
2599–2603
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00705-020-04733-0
Source
Springer Nature
License
Green

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is caused by SFTS virus (SFTSV). Although SFTS originated in China, it is an emerging infectious disease with prevalence confirmed in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. The full-length genomes of 51 Korean SFTSV isolates from 2013 to 2016 were sequenced, and the sequences were deposited into a public database (GenBank) and analyzed to elucidate the phylogeny and evolution of the virus. Although most of the Korean SFTSV isolates were closely related to previously reported Japanese isolates, some were closely related to previously reported Chinese isolates. We identified one Korean strain that appears to have resulted from multiple inter-lineage reassortments. Several nucleotide and amino acid variations specific to the Korean isolates were identified. Future studies should focus on how these variations affect virus pathogenicity and evolution.

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